Updated man pages: Removed the notice that whatnow could be called internally.
[mmh] / docs / README.developers
1 #
2 # README.developers
3 #
4
5 This file is intended to provide a few tips for anyone doing development on nmh.
6 Developers who learn things "the hard way" about the nmh codebase (as opposed to
7 local info best encoded in a comment) are encouraged to share their wisdom here.
8
9 The topics are organized alphabetically.
10
11
12 --------------
13 autoconf files
14 --------------
15
16 If you wish to change the `configure' script or its related files, you'll need
17 to first install GNU m4, available from <ftp://ftp.gnu.org/pub/gnu/m4/> and then
18 GNU autoconf (<ftp://ftp.gnu.org/pub/gnu/autoconf/>).  Nmh is currently using
19 a minimum of autoconf 2.54.
20
21 Most of the configure-related files are automatically generated.  The only files
22 you should need to manually edit are acconfig.h and configure.ac.  Don't, for
23 instance, edit config.h.in.  Though it is an input file from the point of view
24 of the users (and the configure script) it is an output file from the point of
25 view of the developers (and the autoconf script).
26
27 Note that the automatically generated autoconf files (such as config.h.in,
28 stamp-h.in, and configure), are NOT kept in git.  Thus, when you check out
29 a git tree, you need to run the autogen.sh script before you can build
30 anything:
31
32         % ./autogen.sh
33
34 -------------------
35 directory structure
36 -------------------
37
38 Following is a list of nmh's directories along with a brief description of the
39 purpose of each one.  Meanings are given for the abbreviations, but note that
40 these meanings are just informed guesses as to what the MH developers were
41 thinking.
42
43 ./
44     The top-level directory.  Contains files like README and INSTALL.
45
46 config/
47     Contains utility files for the `configure' process.  Ordinarily nothing in
48     here needs to be messed with.
49
50 docs/
51     Contains more specialized documentation, such as this file and
52     the FAQ.
53
54 etc/
55     Contains files, file templates, and scripts to generate files that will be
56     installed in the ${prefix}/etc directory.  Stuff like replcomps.
57
58 h/
59     Most of nmh's header (.h) files are kept not in the individual source
60     directories, but in this central location.
61
62 man/
63     Contains all the input files that are processed to generate nmh's manual
64     pages.
65
66 sbr/
67     "sbr" stands for "subroutine(s)".  For the most part, each source file in
68     this directory contains a single function with the same name as the source
69     file.  These functions are of general use and are called from throughout
70     nmh.
71
72 uip/
73     "uip" stands for "User Interface Programs".  Most nmh commands have a file
74     in this directory named <command>.c containing the code for that command
75     (e.g. repl.c).  In some cases there is also an auxiliary file called
76     <command>sbr.c which contains additional subroutines called from <command>.c
77     (which would contain not much else besides main()).
78
79
80 ---
81 git
82 ---
83
84 As of December 2010, nmh has switched to using git for revision control
85 instead of CVS.  While the topic of git is beyond the scope of this FAQ,
86 to get started with git & nmh, you can run the following command to checkout
87 the nmh repository:
88
89     % git clone git://git.savannah.nongnu.org/nmh.git
90
91
92 -------------------------------------------------------
93 nmh-local functions to use in preference to OS versions
94 -------------------------------------------------------
95
96 For some system functions whose availability or behavior varies from OS to OS,
97 nmh conditionally uses a local definition with the same name as the OS function
98 (e.g. snprintf()).  For other functions, developers need to avoid the OS
99 versions and always use the nmh-supplied function.  Here is a list of such
100 functions:
101
102 OS function  nmh-local version to use instead
103 ===========  ================================
104 getpass()    nmh_getpass()
105
106
107 -------------
108 releasing nmh
109 -------------
110
111 To make a public release of nmh (we'll use version 1.0.4 and my mhost.com
112 account, danh, as examples here; the convention for release candidates
113 is to use something like "1.0.4-RC1"):
114
115  1. % echo 1.0.4 > VERSION
116     % date +"%e %B %Y" > DATE
117     (DATE should contain something like "30 December 2000")
118
119  2. Put a comment like "Released nmh-1.0.4." in the ChangeLog.
120
121  3. % cvs commit ChangeLog VERSION DATE
122
123  4. % cvs tag nmh-1_0_4
124     (cvs treats dots specially, so underscores are substituted here.)
125
126  5. % make nmhdist
127
128  6. Untar nmh-1.0.4.tar.gz and `diff -r' it vs. your CVS tree.  Make sure no
129     files got left out of the distribution that should be in it (due to someone
130     forgetting to update the DIST variables in the Makefiles).
131
132  7. If you have root access on your machine, it's good at this point to do:
133
134     % chown -R 0:0 nmh-1.0.4
135     % tar cvf nmh-1.0.4.tar nmh-1.0.4
136     % gzip nmh-1.0.4.tar
137
138     If you leave the files in the archive as being owned by yourself, your UID
139     may coincide with one of a user on a machine where nmh is being installed,
140     making it possible for that user to Trojan the nmh code before the system
141     administrator finishes installing it.
142
143  8. Make sure your new tarball uncompresses and untars with no problem.  Make
144     sure you can configure, make, and install nmh from it.
145
146  9. If all is well and your tarball is final, go back to your CVS tree and do:
147
148     % echo 1.0.4+dev > VERSION
149
150 10. Put a comment like "Upped the version number to 1.0.4+dev until the next nmh
151     release." in the ChangeLog.
152
153 11. % cvs commit ChangeLog VERSION
154
155 12. If possible, make an MD5 hash and/or a PGP signature of nmh-1.0.4.tar.gz.
156     Assuming you have gpg set up, this should be:
157     % gpg --output nmh-1.0.4.tar.gz.sig --detach-sig nmh-1.0.4.tar.gz
158
159     You can verify the signature with
160     % gpg --verify nmh-1.0.4.tar.gz.sig nmh-1.0.4.tar.gz
161
162 13. Upload the files to savannah. First make sure they are mode 664 so
163     they will have the right permissions on the server end
164     (see https://savannah.gnu.org/maintenance/SharedDownloadArea)
165     % chmod 664 nmh-1.0.4.tar.gz*
166
167     Then scp them across:
168     % scp -p nmh-1.0.4.tar.gz* youruser@dl.sv.nongnu.org:/releases/nmh/
169
170 14. Update the http://www.nongnu.org/nmh/ homepage. (It lives in the 'webpages
171     repository'; see https://savannah.nongnu.org/cvs/?group=nmh)
172
173 15. Add a news item to the savannah nmh page. You'll have to submit it first
174     and then separately approve it (under News->Manage).
175
176 16. Send the release announcement email to the following places:
177      nmh-workers@nongnu.org
178      nmh-announce@nongnu.org
179      exmh-users@redhat.com
180      exmh-workers@redhat.com
181      mh-e-users@lists.sourceforge.net
182      mh-users@ics.uci.edu *or* comp.mail.mh (there is a bidirectional gateway)
183
184     If the release fixes significant security holes, also send an announcement
185     to bugtraq@securityfocus.com.  The exmh lists require you to be subscribed
186     in order to post.  Note that you don't need to post separately to
187     comp.mail.mh, as the mh-users mailing list is apparently bidirectionally
188     gatewayed to it.
189
190     Preferably, the announcement should contain the MD5 hash generated above,
191     and should be PGP-signed.  It should include the URL for the tarball as
192     well as the URL of the website.  It should contain a brief summary of
193     visible changes, as well as the URL of the cvsweb diff page that would show
194     a detailed list of changes.  The changes between 1.2 and 1.3 would be
195     shown by:
196
197         http://cvs.savannah.gnu.org/viewvc/nmh/ChangeLog?root=nmh&r1=1.215&r2=1.254.2.13
198